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Car Rental Ontario

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Why Hertz

  • Best price guarantee - in the unlikely event you find a lower Hertz price, we'll refund the difference
  • No cancellation or amendment fees**
  • No hidden extras to pay - theft and damage cover included
  • No credit card fees

Hertz in Ontario

Car rental in Ontario is incredibly easy thanks to the many Hertz branches located around the province. Ontario is the second-biggest province in Canada, with two major cities and stunning national parks, so by car really is one of the most convenient ways to travel.

Whether you are visiting the Canadian capital of Ottawa, staying in the Ontario capital of Toronto, hitting the slopes at one of the many ski resorts or braving the great outdoors, if you rent a car in Ontario you can do it all with convenience and in comfort. Renting a car also means you won’t be reliant on public transport, so you can go entirely at your own pace.

Driving and Parking in Ontario

You will need a full driving licence and must be over 20 to rent a car in Ontario. If you are from outside Canada you will also need an International Driving Permit (IDP). For more information about driving regulations in Ontario, take a look at our page about renting a car in Canada.

As Ontario is so large, driving is really the only way to ensure that you can travel around the province easily. Running across Ontario is the TransCanada Highway - a network of highways that runs right across the country. Be aware that even if you do rent a car in Ontario, you will still need to fly in order to see the northern half of the province. Roads here are fairly uncommon and so you will need to travel by plane (or sometimes train) to see anywhere north of Lake Nipigon.

Ontario has strict anti-speeding laws and you can be hit with a fine of between $2,000 and $10,000 for travelling more than 50km/h or 30mph over the speed limit or for other dangerous manoeuvres. Your punishment would also include a seven-day vehicle impound and licence suspension.

The accessibility of parking in Ontario very much depends on where you are. More rural locations will have access to free parking or metered street parking. Larger cities such as Toronto and Ottawa have lots of car parks, although the usual issues of finding a space in a major city apply.

 

Driving in and around Ontario

Key Routes

The main route running through Ontario is the TransCanada Highway, made up mainly of Highways 11 and 17. This route crosses all of the Canadian provinces and you can follow Highway 11 from Rainy River going northward at North Bay before heading south again, or Highway 17 from Manitoba, taking a less northerly route along Lake Superior. Both highways come together at Thunder Bay.

The Ontario sections of the TransCanada Highway offer amazing views of the Canadian landscape and take you through some of the less tourist-heavy spots.

Major Highways

When you rent a car in Ontario, you’ll discover there are several different types of highway running through the province.

The 400-Series King’s Highways are at least four lanes wide and include some toll routes. The speed limit on these roads is, for the most part, 100km/h (62mph) but this has been reduced on some highways so pay attention to all signage.

After the 400-Series routes are the King’s Highways which have a numerical designation between 2 and 148. These are single and dual carriageway roads although some have been updated in recent years to carry more lanes. Most have a posted speed limit of 80km/h or 50mph, but on some this is higher or lower.

Secondary Highways are designed to connect smaller, more rural towns to the major highways and some are still gravel-surfaced. They have numerical designations between 502 and 673 and most have a speed limit of 80km/h or 50mph.

** When the booking is cancelled within seven days of being made.